Sylvester

Sylvester

I CAN’T REMEMBER where Sylvester came from except that it was somewhere in the north of Kenya. This I do know, he’d had a long and arduous journey: setting out very early in the morning, mostly on foot with a stretch on the back of a pickup truck. At last he reached the small village where the Bible School was to be held. As I stood up to teach I noticed Sylvester on the front row—smartly dressed as though he’d just walked out of a dressing room, and keen to listen. We learned later that this was his first visit to a Christadelphian meeting of any kind. His sole previous contact with us was with an English lady who had used correspondence courses and letters to help give him a good understanding of what the Bible teaches. I was talking about the book of Revelation, and he was engrossed. He

The Journey Begins

The Journey Begins

IMAGINE THE ATMOSPHERE at school on the last day of the summer term. There is a special air of bubbling excitement as the books are closed for the last time and the sweet freedom of the holiday beckons. Imagine, then, the feelings of the people of Israel, as Moses led them out of Egypt. All their lives they had slaved under the unremitting burdens of the Egyptians, with not even a break at weekends to make Iife bearable. To escape from that miserable bondage was Iiving out a dream. Moreover, Moses promised them that before long they would cross the desert and take over a prosperous land, ‘flowing with milk and honey’ (Exodus 3:8), where each of them would have their own smallholding and work for themselves. It really was too good to be true. The laughter, dancing, and happiness were a totally new experience for God’s suffering people. On

Baptism is not Optional

Baptism is not Optional

I USED TO wonder why Christadelphians get so hung up on the subject of baptism, but now I know. Quite simply, it’s because they take the Bible seriously. I want to show you one particular ‘golden thread’ which runs from Genesis to Revelation. In Genesis 6 we read of Noah, who built a huge boat to save his family and the animals with them from the Flood which God sent to sweep away the wickedness of the world. So a principle was established— salvation by means of water. In Exodus 14 we see the nation of Israel escaping from the pursuing Egyptian army by miraculously passing through the Red Sea. The Apostle Paul says this was symbolic of baptism (1 Corinthians 10:2): they were being cleansed from their life of slavery so they could become God’s people. The thread shines through the New Testament. It’s there all the time, and