Your E-mails- October 2021

Your E-mails- October 2021

Why is Jesus sometimes referred to as the Son of Man and sometimes as the Son of God? HE IS BOTH. His mother was Mary, his father was God. As the angel said to Mary: ‘And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High’ (Luke 1:31–32). The terms ‘son of man’ and ‘son of God’ are both used throughout the Bible. ‘Son of man’ can be a general term for a human, for example ‘Put not your trust in princes, in a son of man, in whom there is no salvation’ (Psalm 146:3). ‘Son of God’ usually refers to Godly people, for example ‘all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God’ (Romans 8:14). But the majority of times each phrase occurs,

Mark

Mark

THIS GOSPEL was written by John Mark, the nephew of Barnabas. He went with Paul and Barnabas on their preaching mission to Cyprus (Acts 13:4–5). He was well known to Peter who called him his “son” (1 Peter 5:13) and may have been the “young man” referred to in Mark 14:51. Four Views of Jesus An interesting connection has been made between the four Gospels and the four faces of the “living creatures”, or cherubim, of Ezekiel’s prophecy (compare Ezekiel 1:10 with 10:14–15). Just as those creatures each had four faces—a man, a lion, an ox and an eagle—so the four Gospels, while offering a full portrait, present characteristically different views of the Lord Jesus Christ. The lion is a fitting symbol to represent Matthew’s view of the ‘King’. The ox corresponds to Mark’s view of the ‘Servant’. The human face relates to Luke’s view of Christ the ‘Man’ (often

Worse Than the Virus

Worse Than the Virus

COVID 19 has been a worldwide tragedy that has changed our lives. Some people are traumatised by it, while others deny its severity or try to ignore it. We can be enormously grateful for those scientists who worked hard to understand the virus and formulate vaccines. The Problem Many people don’t realise that there is a worldwide problem which affects us all, and is far, far worse than the virus. It is an old-fashioned word, and it is an unpleasant concept. But it features strongly in the Bible. It is ‘SIN’. Like it or not, we all sin. And like it or not, we all die as a result. If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us (1 John 1:8). For the wages of sin is death.… (Romans 6:23). Isolation is a good precaution against contracting the virus, but it cannot

The True Vine

The True Vine

The Gospel of John records a number of sayings of Jesus which begin “I am…” In this series we think about some of the profound things he said about himself. You can catch up with the previous articles at https://gladtidingsmagazine.org/previous-articles/ I AM THE TRUE VINE, and my Father is the vine dresser. Every branch in me that does not bear fruit he takes away, and every branch that does bear fruit he prunes, that it may bear more fruit. Already you are clean because of the word that I have spoken to you. Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit by itself, unless it abides in the vine, neither can you, unless you abide in me. I am the vine; you are the branches. Whoever abides in me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you

The Man of Sorrows

The Man of Sorrows

THERE ARE JUST TWO occasions in the Gospels on which we’re told that Jesus Christ wept. The first is recorded in John chapter 11. Lazarus, a close friend, had died, and Jesus went to meet his grieving family. He could have gone earlier and healed Lazarus of his disease. But he deliberately waited till Lazarus had died, then went with the purpose of raising him back to life: ‘Our friend Lazarus has fallen asleep, but I go to awaken him’ (John 11:11). In this episode the Lord was teaching profound lessons about his mission to the world: ‘I am the resurrection and the life’ (v. 25). He is the Lord of life, and death has no power over those who are his. As they approached the village of Bethany, Lazarus’s two distraught sisters came out to meet them. Jesus and his disciples were escorted to the tomb by the mourners.

The Choice

The Choice

MOSES STARED AGHAST at the bright blood seeping into the sand. He had killed a man. For a moment he stood still, paralysed by the enormity of his deed, and then, panicking, fell to his knees and began to scrabble a shallow grave. Soon the Egyptian taskmaster’s body was covered from sight, and only the footmarks showed where they had fought in the hot sun. It had been a fateful day for Moses. He was 40 years old, in his prime, strong, resourceful and self-confident. Brought up as the foster child of Pharaoh’s daughter, he had enjoyed the privileges of his station, and a real taste for luxury and power. Lately, however, a change had come over him. Although the crowds cheered as enthusiastically as ever when he drove out in his splendid chariot, he hardly seemed to hear them. He found himself drawn repeatedly to the new cities his

The name of God

The name of God

IN THE BIBLE names often have meaning— they tell us something about the person. For example Abraham was the ancestor of the Jews and many of the Arabs, and the spiritual ancestor of all God’s people (Galatians 3:29): and his name means ‘Father of a multitude’. There is one name which occurs far more often than any other name. It appears only in the Old Testament, but it appears nearly 7,000 times. It’s a beautiful and majestic name which is full of meaning. As you would expect, it’s the name of God Himself. If you’re a Bible reader you may just be wondering how you’ve missed it. The answer is that most Bibles don’t print it—but they indicate where it should be. Wherever you see the words Lord or God in capital letters, that’s where God’s name was in the original Hebrew manuscripts. Some Bible readers insert the name wherever

E-Mails: July 2021

E-Mails: July 2021

In his prayer at the Last Supper Jesus said “I have glorified You on the earth. I have finished the work which You have given me to do. And now, O Father, glorify me together with Yourself, with the glory which I had with You before the world was” (John 17:4-5). This sounds very much as though Jesus is co-equal and co- eternal with the Father. THIS IS ONE of the most beautiful prayers in the Bible. It’s a prayer of the Son to his Father that the love and unity which they have between them may be shared with his disciples. When you read the chapter through, it’s clear that Jesus was sent by his Father, was given his work by his Father, he’s glorified his Father; his Father gave him his disciples… so the first question is, does this really sound like the prayer of one who is

The Suffering Servant

The Suffering Servant

ISAIAH CHAPTER 53 contains a remarkable prophecy, which is sometimes known as the ‘suffering servant’ prophecy. It was probably written at the time of the illness of the Jewish King Hezekiah which is described in Isaiah 38, and it seems that some of the prophecy’s details were fulfilled by Hezekiah. But the New Testament writers quote from and allude to this prophecy on a number of occasions and apply it to Jesus Christ (for example Matthew 8:17, Acts 8:30-35 and 1 Peter 2:22). I’m going to suggest that Hezekiah’s illness, his miraculous recovery and the gracious extension of his life comprise a partial fulfilment of the suffering servant prophecy. This period of the king’s life was a parable about the saving work of the Lord Jesus Christ, in whom the prophecy was completely fulfilled. The Exalted Servant The prophecy begins in chapter 52: “Behold, My Servant shall deal prudently; he

The Light of the World

The Light of the World

The Gospel of John records a number of sayings of Jesus which begin “I am…” In this series we think about some of the profound things he said about himself. You can catch up with the previous articles here. JESUS SAID, “I am the light of the world. He who follows me shall not walk in darkness, but have the light of life” (John 8:12). What did he mean by this? He didn’t mean it literally, because he was not actually a physical light, but he meant it spiritually. Jesus himself said of his cousin John the Baptist, “He was the burning and shining lamp, and you were willing for a time to rejoice in his light” (John 5:35). John was sent by God to prepare the way for Jesus. John was a burning lamp who shone for a time: Jesus was the light of the world who gives the