Baptism is not Optional

Baptism is not Optional

I USED TO wonder why Christadelphians get so hung up on the subject of baptism, but now I know. Quite simply, it’s because they take the Bible seriously. I want to show you one particular ‘golden thread’ which runs from Genesis to Revelation. In Genesis 6 we read of Noah, who built a huge boat to save his family and the animals with them from the Flood which God sent to sweep away the wickedness of the world. So a principle was established— salvation by means of water. In Exodus 14 we see the nation of Israel escaping from the pursuing Egyptian army by miraculously passing through the Red Sea. The Apostle Paul says this was symbolic of baptism (1 Corinthians 10:2): they were being cleansed from their life of slavery so they could become God’s people. The thread shines through the New Testament. It’s there all the time, and

Malachi

Malachi

MALACHI’S NAME means ‘messenger of God’. He was the last of God’s prophets in the Old Testament, prophesying after the Jewish exile in Babylon. After his days ‘the sun went down on the prophets’ (Micah 3:6) for about 400 years—until the time of Jesus. The Message Malachi was told to remind Israel that God had been good to them, but that priests and people alike had failed (1:2). Their punishment must come and God would open His message to the Gentiles (non- Jews). A greater priest is to come—the Lord Jesus Christ, “the Messenger of the covenant” (3:1). Through him God will make a new covenant with believers, both Jews and Gentiles. Chapter 3 foretells Christ’s coming in judgement—or blessing—depending how he is received. He is to be preceded by a forerunner who will “prepare the way before Me” (3:1). When he first came, his forerunner was John the Baptist

The Light of the World

The Light of the World

The Gospel of John records a number of sayings of Jesus which begin “I am…” In this series we think about some of the profound things he said about himself. You can catch up with the previous articles here. JESUS SAID, “I am the light of the world. He who follows me shall not walk in darkness, but have the light of life” (John 8:12). What did he mean by this? He didn’t mean it literally, because he was not actually a physical light, but he meant it spiritually. Jesus himself said of his cousin John the Baptist, “He was the burning and shining lamp, and you were willing for a time to rejoice in his light” (John 5:35). John was sent by God to prepare the way for Jesus. John was a burning lamp who shone for a time: Jesus was the light of the world who gives the